Overview

My principal findings were straight-forward:
  • First, in 2014 there were approximately 4,125,164 employees in the entire U.S. information technology sector ==> 300,431 were Black, and 277,280 were Hispanic.
  • Second, the percentage of tech employees who were Black was higher in states that had larger Black populations and smaller in states that had smaller Black populations. The same relationship between population size and the percentage of tech employment held true for Hispanics.
  • Third, if all other things were equal, one would expect that the percentage of a state’s tech sector that was Black would be about the same as the percentage of the state’s total population that was Black. One would would expect similar parity for the percentages of Hispanics. But all of things were not equal, so I found that the percentage of the tech sector of most states that was Black or Hispanic was substantially smaller than the percentage of the state’s total population that was Black or Hispanic. By contrast, I found that the percentage of state tech sectors that was Asian ranged as high as 4.4 times the percentage of the state’s total population that was Asian.
  • Fourth, the strengths of these relationships varied widely: some states offered substantially larger employment opportunities for Blacks and Hispanics in their information technology sectors than others.
    back-to-top